Skip to main content

Small, faithful actions make a big difference

Morning: Psalm 15, 67; Job 29:1-16; Acts 4:32-37
Evening: Psalm 19, 146; Acts 9:26-31
Today the Church remembers Barnabas, who sold a field and gave the proceeds to the apostles.  This was in keeping with their revolutionary practice of holding possessions in common.  Barnabas gave his property to serve the common good.  Later, he brought to the apostles a man named Saul, who had persecuted Christians. Barnabas vouched for him.  Saul, as Paul, spread the message of Jesus throughout the known world.  So indirectly, Barnabas’ acts of faithfulness changed the world.  May Barnabas inspire us, too, to the small acts of faithfulness that make more of a difference than we can ever imagine.



Popular posts from this blog

To what does Jesus call you?

Morning: Psalm 37:1-18; Daniel 5:13-30; I John 5:13-20Evening: Psalm 37:19-42; Luke 5:1-11 Fishing for people never appealed to me.  The song said we would become “fishers of men” if we followed Jesus.  This did not persuade me to want to follow him – I would not want to be ‘caught’; nor, I thought, would others.  But my imagination and heart, on the other hand, were captivated, even captured, by this mysterious man from Galilee.  Now, he used his fishers metaphor to call fishermen. He may call an engineer to build bridges to people’s hearts; an artist, to colour the world; a mother, to give birth to truth.  To what does Jesus call you?

Neither faith nor unfaith depend on evidence

Morning: Psalms 20, 21;1 Kings 17:17–24; 3 John 1–15Evening: Psalms 23, 27: John 4:46–54
Some say they don’t believe in God because of what happens, or because of what doesn’t.  Others say they believe because signs and wonders convince them.  Both rely on evidence.  Jesus teaches that, when faith depends on signs and wonders, it’s not faith.  Belief seeks no evidence. The absence of signs and wonders does not disprove God’s existence any more than their presence proves it (although, as today’s story shows, signs and wonders can help!) Instead, faith means entrusting yourself to the other without conditions.  Then, see what happens.

Overcoming the power of death

Morning: Psalms 63:1-11, 98;Daniel 9:3-10; Hebrews 2:10-18
Evening: Psalm 103; John 12:44-50
People think Christianity is about life after death.  But it’s about living today free from the power of death, which is anything that keeps us from enjoying full lives.  Many institutions live in the thrall of the power of death … churches so devoted to tradition that they forget what it means; businesses more concerned with profit than with lives ruined by the environmental damage they cause; or governments more concerned with re-election than with serving the lives of citizens.  All these are instances of the power of death.  The Way of Jesus seeks to liberate us from death’s power.